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bank of america and wells fargo and u.s. bancorp endlessly on any dip over and over again. that's why i bought them for my charitable trust. i knew they had to come in. they could take all they wanted and they're doing it. oil and natural gas, down last week. what a chance to get in. even though the earnings were widely lambasted. you see, they had no choice. the big-shot money managers simply cannot catch a double-digit move from the sidelines. they can no longer hope that the market will come down because it's up too darn much. and most of them don't have the luxury of being up so much that they can leave the table. they're being forced back to the table where they have to place bets whenever any discount whatsoever occurs. and they know where they won't move the stocks with their aggressive buying. think back to bank of america, think wells fargo. oh, that's selling? they've got to hone every share they have. they can't afford to sell anything, they'll lose their exposure. they have too much buying to do here's the bottom line -- we are in self-fulfilling mode now. that's why i keep
at markets where there is little talk, air america or other avenues of talk and these stations are often times read it 28, 29, 30, 34th in the marketplace, you can't exist that way. that really drives little snots. they can't admit their ideas failed in the free market place therefore what do they do? they run to daddy, the government -- >> host: daddy, very big daddy. >> guest: very baghdad, and they want -- well, give laissez-faire -- they can't believe that in all diverse america that our point of view doesn't work. we don't accept that. that's even contained in the capper report, center for american progress, again, headed by john podesta. stated in that report. welcome the fact the matter is the free market place where ideas germinate and succeed or fail. and we have to value that. >> host: if the liberal point of view doesn't succeed in talk radio that is just one medium, and that is what they are focused on because it fails there however the left has csn come msnbc, "washington post," "new york times," "boston globe," pretty much every newspaper with the exception of very few in a
the fruited plains america america god shed his grace on thee ♪ ♪ and crown thy good with brotherhood ♪ ♪ from sea to shining sea ♪ >> so appropriate to have the prayer from father coughlan, roman catholic faith was central to the life of senator kennedy, even when he strayed or sometimes crashed off the straight and narrow life, he always came back to the church. that's his son, patrick, you see in the foreground, standing at the hearse, the body of his father. >> thank you very much for attending. eternal rest granted unto him, oh, lord, and let perpetual life shine upon him. may he rest in peace. may his soul and outlet souls of the faithfully departed to the mercy of god rest in peace. ame amen. >> senator bobby byrd talking with lawrence schribe in the background. there was no detailed program for this part of the motorcade. so, we'll ask you to bear with us. we don't know quite what to expect next. i think that might have been the conclusion of what they wanted to do here, give an opportunity to the senate staffers to come out. pat leahy, senate of the judicial committee i
that this family is inextricably tied to the fabric of america. as teddy realized as he was writing his memoir. and perhaps not inheriting the seat that may not come to pass. in this generation. but look at all those little faces. they have lives yet to be written. >> the freckle-faced children that we remember through the many generations. and today's generation on display. >> military pall bearers, leaving the vehicle now. to paraphrase one of his favorite poetry selections that we heard repeated during the mass, ted kennedy has miles to go before he arrives at his final resting place later today. his body will now be taken to hanscomb air force base in boston and flown to andrews air force base. they'll drive by capitol hill, and they'll stop and be greeted by members of senator kennedy's staff. as you may know, among many things senator kennedy was known for compiling absolutely the best and brightest staff on capitol hill. it grew in size as his power grew. and it has launched so many other famous careers. a current supreme court justice, stephen brier, just one of them. they're going to
their patriarch. the last brother from the family that is as close to political royalty as america has ever seen. i'm ed schultz. welcome back to msnbc's continuing coverage of the passing of senator ted kennedy. senator kennedy died in overnight hours in his home surrounded by his family, including his wife and children. nbc's anne thompson is at the kennedy compound in hyannisport, massachusetts, where well-wishers have been gathering since early this morning. anne, any word yet on funeral arrangements? >> ed, we do not know what the funeral plans are. we hope to get that information later today or perhaps as late as tomorrow. we can tell you this morning, we have seen a roman catholic priest drive into the compound. we have seen other various people go into the compound this morning, but we have not seen any family members that we recognize. we do understand that last evening, as the senator's health deteriorated, his extended family gathered here at the family compound at his -- his house which was rose and joe, his parents' house and that when he died, he was surrounded by his immediate fam
, and remember, you question with boldness! come on, follow me. hello, america. we have some more questions for you tonight. i believe, just so you know going in that this is probably the most controversial show of the week, because you must understand the last three episodes of this show to be able to see and come to a place where you can believe that these crazy things may actually be happening. i want you to know, i hope these things are not happening. i hope that there is some other explanation, but i needed you to see who is advising the president earlier this week and what they are doing and who they are before i could ask you to look at this phrase from barack obama and think that the president of the united states literally means this. >> we cannot continue to rely only on our military in order to achieve the national security objectives that we set. we've got to have a civilian national security force that's just as powerful, just as strong, just as well funded. glenn: i mean, i don't know how anybody is going to respond to the facts that i'm going to present tonight, because quite
everything because they have no cars. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. it is saturday, august 29th. good morning, kate. >> good morning, bill. we're here at the jfk presidential library in boston. senator ted kennedy lies in repose behind me in this building. we're told family members at this hour are getting ready at their hotel to come here. a senate delegation will come here, as well. they will all pay their last respects. and we'll have coverage of the senator's journey to his final resting place. we'll talk to one of his nephews about his legacy. and some of his former staffers, like supreme court justice stephen breyer, who said working for ted kennedy was like a family. we know you have more, bill? >> we do. >>> we have more on that shocking story. jaycee lee dugard, held for 18 years. we're learning details of her ordeal, including reports that the neighbors voiced some concerns three years ago. but investigators never made it past the front porch. >>> and also, another story out of california. everything must go. that is, if it's government pro
for growth and prosperity in the long run. these are the jobs futuring of america, renovating schools and hospitals. the elkhart area has seen the benefits. dozens were employed to resurface the runway at elkhart airport. a four mile stretch of highway is being upgrade order u.s. 33. the health center has received recovery dollars to expand services and hire additional staff. and as part of the recovery plan, we're making an historic amendment to innovation. building a new smart grid that carries electricity from coast to coast, laying down broad band lines and high speed rail lines, and providing the largest boost in basic research in history to ensure that american leads in the break through discoveries of the new century. just as we led in the last. because that's what we do best in america. we turn ideas ainto inventions. history should be our guide. the united states led the world economies in the 20th century because we led the world in innovation. today the competition is keen, the challenge is tougher and that's why innovation is more important than ever. that's the key to goo
the celebration by singing god bless america and i hope you'll join them. . . the hope still lives and the dream shall never die. he had his sleeves and wakeful nights. he had his nightmares and yet he dreamt a dream that was trapped of the heart -- that was a draft of the heart and only his great heart could hold. he gave flesh to that the dream in the noble house of his thought where the sick were healed, the sphere broken, and the stranger welcomed. it is the age-old dream of the profits -- of the profitphets. there will be a bank would ge-- there will be a bank with yet -- there will be a banquet yet. the laugh, the sound of roses, the music -- may flights of angels sing thee to thy rest. ♪ ♪ dodd bless america -- god bless america ♪ landed that i love the ♪ stand beside her ♪ and the guide her ♪ through the night ♪ with the light from above ♪ from the mountain to the prairie ♪ to the ocean ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ died bless america -- god bless america ♪ land that i love ♪ stand beside her ♪ and a
. >>> good morning, america. it is august 29th. saturday morning. and a who's who of american politics is descending on boston. th's where kate snow is this morning. good morning, kate. >> good morning, bill. senator ted kennedy lies in pose. a senate delegation will arrive shortly to the library where we are to pay their last respects. we'll have journey to his final resting place. we'll talk to one of his nephews about carrying on his legacy. and we'll talk to some of his former staffers, including supreme court justice steven breyer. and he'll talk about how he inspired them to greatness. i know you have more to come in new york, bill. >> we do, kate. >>> we have the latest on that shocking story out of california. jaycee dugard, kidnapped in california. held for 18 years. we're learning new details, including just how close the authorities came to finding jaycee, when neighbors had their suspicions. >>> and a different story in northern california. everything must go, if it's government property, that is. the state is in such dire financial straits, they're having a fire sale. comp
. it was fought to make america be america for all its citizens. these were america's civil rights leaders. >> host: how would you describe this period in the 1950's to the young african-americans who only read about it through history books? and we should point out the year you were born, 1954. >> guest: exactly. what was interesting to me is i went on a book tour for "eyes on the prize" realizing how many people hadn't lived through this year, and this was of course than the late 80's and early 90's. so today it is overwhelming. most americans today, a quarter of the population are under 18. they have no concept. with a new is martin luther king is a hero or to be viewed as a hero, viewed positively although we get some younger people who think that he's just an image, they want a more militant figure. like malcolm x that would stand up, sort of the defiant black lace. then you get people who don't understand. they -- something like a colored blanking fountain, just bizarre or you get white kids who don't understand how recent so many of these indignities and limits in terms of education
-- to boost relations between america and of those countries. >> our team coverage continues with kate live in the studio. >> maryland officials highlight senator kennedy's accomplishments, the work he did, and the way he did it. >> i present to this convention, senator edward kennedy. >> she cochaired his 1980 presidential campaign and introduced into the crowd at the national convention. in a conversation on wednesday, she shared memories of her colleague and friend. >> ted kennedy had the courage of his conviction. he had such a great gift of working across party lines. it being willing to compromise without compromising his ideals. that is what he would want us to do now. >> across maryland, leaders pause honor his legacy. >> [unintelligible] >> from the moment of silence at the city hall to the courts in annapolis. >> my condolences go out to the kennedy family, the shriver family, and the towns and family -- townshend family. >> he said, i saw firsthand his dedication to build a society for america. it will be deeply missed. many officials called kennedy a hero and a mentor, including
of the difficulty of psychology of being black in america, he was the first person obviously to be on the court and understood right away that as he went through confirmation hearings and then just gone through confirmation hearings with briefing by to clarence thomas hearings and you think minorities and women very difficult and thurgood marshall's last three months and his intellect was question talked about was the smart to really be among the nation's legal elite and said there in judgment as a member of the court and when he gets on the court he really thought i must get the very best in terms of law clerks and assistance and what if the both of the idea that he could, in fact, handle this work and respond to the reasons assumptions. >> host: you also a great deal held this theory about how he was elected and also his conversations with lyndon johnson and doubt as to whether he felt it was clear to pick up the phone and call him. >> guest: i use that as the start of a book because in terms of building the narrative his experience in that moment tells you so much about the securities issues
the rewriting of america's restrictive immigration laws, drafted in the 1920s. he fought hard for the immigration and nationality act of 1965, signed by president lyndon johnson. and as america inches toward majority-minority status, with the descendants of european immigrants a declining share of the population, the face of today's america is the one kennedy's efforts helped create, for better... >> i think it is fair to say that senator kennedy was one of the architects of the america of the future. >> suarez: ... or for worse. >> the '65 act put american immigration on auto-pilot. >> suarez: by the time of the john kennedy administration, america had absorbed the huge ellis island generations of immigrants who poured in from europe from roughly 1880 to 1920. president kennedy, whose great- grandparents came to boston from ireland, supported scrapping the existing quota system that used 19th-century america's ethnic makeup as a template for letting in new arrivals, favoring europeans and effectively sealing off newcomers from the rest of the world. on the senate floor in 200
on "america this morning," the new addition at the san diego zoo. >> let's sayhey already know the youngster has a good set of >> let's sayhey already know the youngster has a good set of lungs. ca help save a lot m of america up to 20% cash back from over 300 online retailers with our add it up program. just sign up and use your bank of america debit or credit card when .you shop online. it's one of the many ways we make saving money in tough times a whole lot easier. having to go in the iddle of traffic, and just starting nd stopping. having to go in the "middle of a ballgame and then not being able !to go once i got there., and going at night. i thought i had a goin problem. my doctor said i had a growing problem. it wasn't my bladder. my prostate was growing. i had an enlarging prostate that was causing my rinary symptoms., my doctor presribed avodart., (announcer) ver time, avodart actually, shrinks the prostate and improves urinary symptoms. so i can go more easil wheni need to go, and go less often. (announcer) ! avodart is for men only. due to risk of a specific birth defect. do not
their loans modified. lenders such as bank of america and wells fargo are called out for not doing enough. and ten lenders have not changed a single mortgage. >>> the s.e.c. is trying to ban a form of financial trading that benefits big wall street firms at the expense of average investors. so-called flash orders allow firms with high-powered computers to essentially peak at stock orders before they are placed. the practice has allowed those companies to rake in billions of dollars. >>> pepsico has struck a deal that will help it capitalize on changing trends. it's buying its two, main bottlers for $8 million. pepsi says it will allow the company to respond more quickly. >>> and procter & gamble can say it makes the official toilet tris of the national football league. they are announcing a sponsorship deal that allows the company to add a label to products, calling them the official locker room product of the nfl. >>> a new report might have parents of newborns crying right alongside their children. government estimates that a child born today will cost $290,000 by the time they finish h
years from now an "america this morning" stamp. >> hard to believe but i hope so. >> you can get the latest business news any time at our website, abcnews.com. >>> coming up next on this wednesday, a major criminal investigation. did the host of a tv crime show order murders to boost his ra ratings? >>> a new message from one of the american women brought home from north korea one week ago today. >>> welcome back. these are the latest headlines from abc news. >>> president obama is trying to regain the momentum in the health care debate by using town hall meetings to press his case. >>> familyembers have gathered at the kennedy come pond in h n hyannisport, mass to remember eunice kennedy shriver. >>> frank dipascali, former cfo for bernard madoff has pleaded guilty and is being held as a flightrying. >>> allegedly commissioning five murders in an effort to boost his ratings. wallace souza not only the host he's a state lawmaker but authorities say his show's cameras suspiciously been at drug trafficker's murder scenes before police knew about them. he's also accused of his own
teddy. >> ♪ god bless america >> it was a celebration of life that mirrored the life that he led, music, laughter, family. >> he taught by example and with love. he showed us how to keep going, to love each other, no matter how mad we got, and keep working for what we believe in. his niece and nephew, children of his brother killed by assassins, spoke of him as a father. >> every single one of my brothers and sisters needed a father, and we gained one through uncle teddy. we needed someone to hang onto, and teddy was always there. >> fellow senators spoke of him as a friend. am i was privileged to serve there, but i think most of my colleagues would agree the police will not be the same without him. >> john fitzgerald kennedy inspired our america. robert kennedy challenged our america. and are teddy changed america. >> the three hours of intensely personal memories followed two days of public viewing by kennedy's other family. in estimated 50,000 people filed past the flag draped coffin, sharing gratitude and hope. >> he was an inspiration to so many people around the world. it is just
. for america, he was the defender of a dream. >> ted kennedy was in fact the last surviving son of a political legacy, a legend in american politics. and a man some call one of the great senators of our time. good evening. i'm jim vance. >> i'm windy rieger in for doreen. the nation mourns the death of senator kennedy. michelle franzen starts us off. >> reporter: a lone spotlight illuminated by a hazard ship in hyannisport, a beacon of hope off the shore of the kennedy family compound. inside family and friends including senator john kerry gather to mourn and reflect on the great life lost. >> there is a very beautiful and personal, private, vigil taking place. it's very spiritual and -- about as -- beautiful as it could be. i think it is everything that senator ken tnedy would have wanted. private and public tributes. kennedy would have loved. [ "taps" plays ] at at fenway park, taps played in his honor. and flags flew at half staff, near his home to capitol hill. >> the liberal lion's mighty roar. i'll always remember. may now fall silent. his dreams shall never die. >> those who knew kenned
. >>> tonight, i'm going to take the liberty to speak to millions of liberals across america. it's been a sad day in america. we lost our man, senator ted kennedy. lost his battle with brain cancer overnight at the age of 77. every time he was on my radio show, i referred to him as the gladiator. he loved that. he was the gladiator for the people. a fighter, a believer. he fought for labor, for worker's rights, civil rights, human rights and social justice. kennedy was the gold standard when it came to fighting for the working folk of america and he left a huge footprint in this country. he was a champion of the cause, an unselfish man who gave so much to the united states of america. but i will remember him as a fighter. now, there's a lot of talk today about his ability to cross the aisle, his bipartisanship, his work, his friendships but he never compromised his principles. he fought for them passionately. if ted kennedy was on your side, he would be in the trenches with you in the 11th hour. you could count on kennedy. >> we still cannot get a $2.15 over two years. over two years. what is
northern virginia here on c-span. >> good morning. i am an intern scholar here at the young america foundation, a leading organization on college campuses. if you would like to take advantage of the resources or campus activism, such as booking speakers were getting materials for events, please contact us by phone or online at our website, www.yaf.org. our next speaker is president of the washington d.c.-based research council which leads the way in defending the judeo- christian values upon which our nation was built. he served in the louisiana state legislature as recognized as a pioneer by offering many measures. he hosts a national radio program called "washington watched weekly." his first book was released just last year. copies will be available of this book for purchase and signing after his talk. a veteran of the u.s. marine corps and a former police officer and tv news reporter, he brings a unique blend of experience and leadership to the pro-family movement. please welcome mr. tony perkins. [applause] >> good morning. it is good to see a friendly crowd here in d.c. for
america's coastline? captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning to you again this morning. i'm diane sawyer in times square. robin is on assignment on this thursday, august 27th. and chris cuomo is anchoring our coverage from hyannisport, massachusetts. chris, good morning. any signs the family is stirring this morning? >> good morning, diane. i don't think i've ever been able to say this before, but the kennedy compound is quiet. and talking to family members, from youngest to oldest yesterday, they all remember teddy the same way. he was there for them always. and now, they are make sure they are there for him. the family is literally, taking shifts, holding vigil, over teddy's body, making sure the man who they love is never alone. even in the final moments, he showed his strength. >> there was a certain peace there that was absolutely beautiful. >> reporter: now, loved ones are gathering at the family compound to mourn and celebrate. >> that's what we're going to do in the next few days. celebrate his life, a wonderful life. >> reporter: a family who played in the surf wh
this year let us offer new hope, new hope to an america uncertain about the present, but unsurpassed in its potential for the future. to all those who are idle in the cities and industries of america let us provide new hope for the dignity of useful work. democrats have always believed that a basic civil right of all americans is their right to earn their own way. the party of the people must always be the party of full employment. to all those who doubt the future of our economy, let us provide new hope for the reindustrialization of america. and let our vision reach beyond the next election or the next year to a new generation of prosperity. if we could rebuild germany and japan after world war ii, then surely we can reindustrialize our own nation and revive our inner cities in the 1980s. to all those who work hard for a living wage let us provide new hope that the price of their employment shall not be an unsafe workplace and a death at an earlier age. to all those who inhabit our land from california to the new york island, from the redwood forest to the gulfstream waters, let us provid
and i mean america really falling back. i mean, america really declining. i mean opportunity slipping away. sound -- founded fierce? unfounded fears? >> the reason they're unfounded is because there's a disconnect between the people who are leading this country and the people who are supposed to be leading. a new poll shows that 70% of americans would favor less government and lower taxes. their attitude, that tastes great and it's less filling. that's what they'd really like to see. but the government and, look, republicans have to take some blame on this because they help set some of this stuff up with the tarp bill last fall. but when you start having a government that ignores the people, holds them in contempt, makes fun of them, calls them a mob -- sean: when did this ever happen? >> ridicules them. the divide gets greater and greater but clearly there's something not getting through to the people in washington, d.c. sean: governor, everything that the government seems to touch is bankrupt. i'm using a term government derangement syndrome, that in spite of the post office failing
our america. robert kennedy challenged our america. our teddy, changed america. >> his personal life revolved around family. he embraced the role of patriarch. >> every single one of my brothers and sisters needed a father. we gained 130 uncle teddy. >> teddy has become a part of history. we have become the ones who have to deal with all of the things he would have done. >> larger-than-life figure in family and politics. he is inspiring the next generation to follow in his footsteps. following the ceremony, his body will be taken to arlington national cemetery where he will be very very close to his brothers. nbc news. >> you can much's funeral live right here on wbal-tv 11 at 10:00 this morning. at 5:30 in the afternoon, we will carry his burial plot. and meet the press will be a special tribute to him and the family dynasty on sunday morning. ♪ >> our other big story is a tropical stanley that we have been falling. >> heavy rains have been moving through the area overnight. >> john collins has been calling its a flat tire. >> danny is deflated considerably, no longer a tropical s
making america less safe? >> jaycee dugard was found alive -- excuse me -- wasç found lyig in antioch.c@ laura: every parent's nightmare, a kidnapped child. caution,çç you are about to er the no spin zone. ççhi, everyone. i am laura ingraham, reporting tonight for bill o'reilly. now, right to our top story tonight. is the mainstream mediaç trying to use violent it's a critic? some say that is the motivation for -- is the mainstream media trying to silence a critic? >>ç how can theç obama plan cr 50 million patients without any new doctors? it cannot. it will hurt our seniors and medicare as we know it, ration care, ça limited life-çsaving madison -- ration care, limit edicine. laura: abc says that the spot departed and position on a controversial issue,çç which violates its longstanding policy -- says the spot takes a position on controversial issues which violates its longstanding policy. ççalso, some straight talk frm democrats, admitting it is too tough to take on some special interests in the health-care bill, like the trial lawyers. here is what dr/çç
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need health care in america. one of the people who really got the people have asked me, what was it like? i tell people that barack obama, the most thing that i will say is driving him is that he watched his white mother died because of inefficiency in health care in america. i think that is the number one driving force, that he does not want to see that happen to americans, white and black, across the board. and he is going to fight with everything he has got because he watched it. he does not have his mother anymore, he does not have his father anymore, and i think he wants people like me who get laid off, 10,000 of us, and know that we need health care in america. thank god for people like sharon brower, the senator who is working hard -- like sherrod brown, the senator who is working hard on behalf of the american people. i worked 45 years of my life and got laid off. people have no idea what it is like to be laid off in america if you have never been laid off. we need this, and i thank god for barack obama, sherrod brown, in the people who are fighting for our rights to
kennedy can be measured in no small part as a consequence of how we in america look at one another. how blacks look at whites, how gays looked straight, house traits lookit days. -- house streets look at today's -- how straights look at gays. and how we look at ourselves. when you were with him, you had to measure yourself against him. it always requires you to be larger than you were inclined to be. his death was not unlike his life. as we all know. overcoming pain and loss with a sense of dignity and pride that is amazing. he met his death in the same grave, generous terms that he lived his life. they could've been thinking about your father when he wrote, the will the fis fear when duty throws the gauntlet down the fate, when scorn compromises with death. this is heroism. your father was a historic figure. he was a heroic figure beyond that. i will remember and celebrate his life every single time i see a young, adolescent kids coping rather than cowering about having to make a decision about his sexuality. i will celebrate your father ever single time i see my granddaughter stand up
health and it is bad for the economic health of america. my husband had alzheimer's disease for 10 years, and sadly he died last year. but i had the freedom to talk to his doctor and participate in his treatment. i would lose that freedom under this bill. some panel of bureaucrats would decide what his treatment would be, and whether or not it would be cost-effective. i agree that our american health care needs reform, but we can do lots of things to improve our present health care. i don't think we need to throw out our present health care and have a whole new government system. i am totally against the government taking it over. [applause] i wanted president obama to succeed, but i am not terrified at the way -- at the direction at this country under president obama, harry reid, and nancy pelosi. they have spent billions of dollars in the last few months, and we're trillions of dollars in debt. congressman connolly, you are our representative. you represent we the people. i implore you to vote no on this bill, preserve our freedom, and prevent our country from sliding into economic rui
in the route of the health care reform in america. codes of rescue are fading in typhoon-stricken taiwan 3 and 15,000 still be trapped, at least 500 dead. -- in timtyphoon-stricken taiwan. 15,000 still trapped. welcome to "bbc world news," on pbs in america and elsewhere around the world. a new brigade gets to work in afghanistan. the president pardon its five top traffickers. and theç liverpoolç and fun, singapore style. cashing in on a growing army of fans abroad. -- the liverpool anthem. hello to you. britain's national health service as a move to the center of the controversy in the u.s. over barack obama'proposeds health-care reform be and the president tries to regain. his opponents are trying to cite the british model as the way not to do it. -- barack obama's proposed health-care reform. the president tries to recover. >> president barack obama and his family said it off for another town hall-style debate on health care, but as america has wrestled with how to solve the problems with its largely insurance-based system, public systems elsewhere have been coming under fire. >> wh
in america. code of rescue are fadg in typhoon-stricken taiwa 3 and 15,000till be trapp, a least 500 dead. -- in timtyphoontricken taiwan. 15,000 still trapped. welcome to "bbc world news," on pbs in america and elsewre around the wld. a new brigadeets to rk in afghanistan. the presidenpardon its five p traffickers. and theç liverpoolç and fun, singapore style. cashing in on a growing my of fans abroa the liverpool anthem. hel toou. britn's national health seice as a move to the cente of the controvsy in the u.s. over barack obama'oposeds health-careeform be and the president tries to regain. his opponentare tryg tcite the brish model as theay not to do it -- barack obama's proposed health-care reform. the president tries to recover. >> president barack obama and hifamily said it off for another town hl-style debate on heth care,but as america has wrestled with how to solve theroblems with its largely insurance-based system, public systs elsewre have been comg under fire. what we need to do is comep with a iquely united way of providg health care, s i am not in favor of a canadian sys
of the family's legendary seaside home. >>> welcome to "america this morning" on this thursday. ir. 'm ii' >> i'm jeremy hubbard. setenar tod nnr edy leaves hised cherished hyannisport home for y e last time today.ke lwinnwillie in repose at the jfk library in boston, beginning tonight, where thousands are expected to pay their respects over the next two days. >> president obama will deliver a eulogy at kennedy's funeral mass on saturday. >> and a special election to fill kennedy's senate seat is scheduled for early this year. that is unless lawmakers change the state succession law. >>> this morning, the kennedy family is gathering to say farewell to a much-loved father, uncle and brother. >> reporter: good morning, jeremy and vinita. after a day of tributes, this is the first of three days of farewell for senator kennedy. there will be ceremonies for him in boston and in arlington, virginia, before he's laid to rest on saturday night. today, senator edward kennedy begins the long, final voyage of a statesman. >> he was ready to go. >> reporter: with flags at halftaff on capitol hill, and amon
"america the beautiful." from here, the family will get back in the motorcade, and the hearse will make its way to arlington national cemetary for a sunset burial. >> glor: as nancy mentioned oa hill in arlington national cemetary near the graves of his brothers, john and robert, ted kennedy will be laid to rest this evening. wyatt andrews reports on how that spot was chosen. wyatt. >> reporter: jeff, good evening. it has long been ted kennedy's dream to join his brothers jack and bobby here at arlington national cemetary. but the story of how this political family came here to this military cemetery is one that began by accident. the kennedys' appreciation for arlington started when president john kennedy decided to take a random sunday drive. it was march of 1963, eight months before his assassination. >> it was a late day, a late winter day. >> reporter: according to journalist and author robert pool kennedy happened to sdrif to the cemetery and then decided to walk this hill. >> he walked to about where we are. >> reporter: as the president absorbed the view overlooking the lincoln memo
been a place of retreat and renewal for america's greatest political dynasty. now they remember a patriarch, and this town remembers a friend. sam barber sold him paintings. >> i'm going to miss him terribly. i'm speechless. >> reporter: ted kennedy's father bought a cottage here in 1928, thinking it would be good for the kids' health. three decades later, ted's brothers john and robert purchased surrounding homes, creating this three acre property simply known as the compound. john is the editor of "the last lion." >> for years of his life, this was the home. this was the one home they kept returning to. they lived in new york, massachusetts, london, england, but for john, this was his anchor. >> reporter: the brothers played their famous games of touch football on the lawn here, training for the youngest brother, a star at harvard. >> i think this was the center of his young world. so many things happened here. certainly, in times of tragedy, this is where the kennedys gathered. >> reporter: a place of mourning too many times for the kennedy clan. ted was there in 1999 when he
kennedy inspired our america. robert kennedy challenged our america. and our teddy, changed america. [ applause ] >> reporter: kennedy cssed the aisle to work with republicans like his friend john mccain. >> ted and i shared the sentiment that a fight not joined was a fight not enjoyed. >> reporter: a video by ken burns portrayed ted kennedy as the captain of the family sailboat. >> he is on a schooner now, sail on, my friend, sail on. >> niece caroline kennedy. >> now teddy has become a part of history and we have become the ones that have to do all the thing he's would have done, for us, for each other, and for our country. ♪ with irish eyes >> the senator will be all jitzed by president obama to whom kennedy said he was passing the torch. then at arlington national cemetery, ted kennedy will be buried next to his brothers. i'm steve handel san, mbs news, boston. >> folks in the nation's capital will get a chance to see senator kennedy's casket after a stop at the u.s. capitol. the funeral procession will go down the mall before it enters the cemetery. craig melvin continues our
the roman empire ruled the world and means america stands anew as the greatest nation on earth. we will fix our problems and come back stronger than most people believe. pax americana boasts the most vibrant economy, and most innovative mind and best form of government so long as it stays out of business and wealth creation. america is exceptional, the one true leader of our planet. frankly, guys, i'm tired of president obama hat in hand apologizing for it to the rest of the world. pitch to the u.s. economy, will you? as a huge rocket ship on the launchpad, countdown has just ended. we have ignition, plumes of smoke are rising and the massive thing is starting to shoulder and shake, and liftoff is about to begin. if you believe in pax amer can narcs america the kickass, you have hope to believe this economy will be far more robust than everyone expects. and darren brooks, a big believe in pax americana. he runs the think tank that encourages individual action. amen. are we in the era of pax americana? >> i think for the last 200 years we have been in the era, this is the greatest nation on
kennedy, a man who fought passionately and pragmatically in the senate. >> he challenged our america, and our teddy changed america. >> people have called teddy and me the odd couple, which was certainly true. >> two of senator kennedy's closest friends, warren hatch of utah and christopher dodd of connecticut, share their personal memories. plus senator maria wall of washington on the post-kennedy debate for office. and in our american dispatch, the kennedy connection to boston sports dynasty. i talked to the president and ceo of the red sox, larry laquino. four years now since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. senator andrews gets the last word. "state of the union" report for sunday, august 30. >>> a man who never stopped trying to right wrongs and someone who wasn't perfect but believed in redemption. just a few of the sentiments expressed at the funeral of senator edward kennedy in boston yesterday. president obama led the eulogy in saying goodbye at arlington cemetary. here is a reflection on senator kennedy's life, oren hatch of utah and senator christopher dodd. se
's reaffirming of america in terms of its values and ideals and the power of the constitution feared that to me is the greatest joy for any writer and journalist and that's the story and try to tell in my books. >> host: we talked about the books you have written. what is next? >> guest: and house -- i am fascinated with malcolm x and wondering if it is time to look again at malcolm x and also given the tremendous diversity of the american population today i'm interested in the founding fathers of this new america. we have seen books about the accounting bothers of america as it emerged in 1700's. i think this time again is to look at a founding fathers of this new america and one represents to the world. >> host: dui d.c. to read about these issues or is it a challenge? >> guest: writing is the greatest intellectual exercise. my -- trained a boxer's nose around people the exercise and had to show tremendous courage on their side, but remained engaging in a buck and the ideas getting those ideas to be real on the page so others can understand that and engage them to me it is my maximum energy a
back at her fashion for good taste on "good morning america." >> from the vault, sushi in 1985 and a tasteful way to prepare sweet peas in 1982. >> when i was living in paris and learning cooking, my old freven chef taught me how to make big old store bought peas and they can be delicious. you start out with half a teaspoon of salt, about three cups of peas and then some lettuce leaves. those are shredded lettuce leaves. then two, three tablespoons of minced shall ots or scallions and about two tablespoons of bulleter. and a little bit of sugar. the reason for that is when you got old peas, you need a little sugar to give them that fresh taste because the sugar in old peas turns to stach. you want to make them taste sweet. >> now, this is the big prick of all. tack your hands and press the ingredients into the piece to brood them because that makes the flavor penetrate and then on to the stove and then put in just enough water to cover the peas and then put them over high heat with the cover on them, let them really boil hard. that's going to steam boil. it will take about 15 m
at 7:00. don't forget, wusa9.com. a few hours ago this campaign came to an end. >> couric: america mourns the lion of the senate. >> we on this side are interested in protecting american servicemen from the close fire of a civil war. >> couric: the man who carried the torch and the burden of a political dynasty. through triumph, tragedy... >> my brother need not be idealized or enlarged in death what... beyond what he was in life. >> couric: and scandal. >> for this reason i would understand full well why some might think it right for me to resign. >> couric: and leave the legacy of landmark legislation that changed millions of lives. >> the work goes on, the cause endures. the hope rises again and the dream lives on. >> couric: tonight, the life of senator ted kennedy. captioning sponsored by cbs good evening, i'm katie couric. this is the "cbs evening news," there is, of course, no royal family in this country. the kennedys, perhaps, the closest we've ever had. for the past 40 years, senator edward kennedy was the patriarch, the last surviving brother of a political dynasty until
it as part of cspan's america and the courts saturday at 7:00, eastern. >> three days of peace, love, and music. 40 years ago this weekend, half a million people gathered for woodstock. saturday, the co-founder will take us behind the scenes. that will be at 9:00 p.m., eastern, on both tv. >> how is cspan funded? >> donations? >> federal funds, grant funds? >> maybe contributions. >> austin, i don't know. >> i would say from commercials. >> advertising? >> something from the government? >> 30 years ago, america pause cable companies created cspan as a public service. it is a private business initiative with no government mandate, no government money. >> while we wait for live coverage of the netroots convention in less than one hour, conversation with one of the conservative bloggers meeting in pittsburgh this weekend from this morning's " washington journal per-ql." host: tell us what you are representing. guest: i am here to talk about conservative activism on line and become larger participants. people across the country can act with one voice. host: we have been checking with rep
the worst run insurance companies in america. they predict he merged them they were poorly run and turn them into the biggest efficient. he is a doctor. he created the biggest insurance company in america for his shareholders. his stock went from nothing to being a very valuable. if you are a shareholder, you probably thought he got a lot of that out of nothing. he turned into an $80 billion company. it is nice to have shareholders who are mutual fund owners investing in united healthcare. he had a lot of stock in 1992. on paper, you can never defend anybody making a billion doctor -- dollars. it is very large, very comprehensive, and its shareholders were rewarded. it is like the government paid it. there are two sides to the story. . he created a massive company. he was in it very early. again, i'm not trying to defend him. certainly the taxpayers never paid united health care $1 billion. they are the single biggest contractor for medicare. they make on average about a 3.5% profit on their part d plan which is drugs and plan which is drugs and probably a 4% margin on their medicare advanta
demand from america's consumers. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning. and thanks for being with us.we violent weather, which has ravished parts of eastern texas. >> it started yesterday afternoon, in the houston area, with heavy rain, strong wind and at least one tornado. >> meanwhile, a construction worker died after rainwater flooded the tunnel he was working in. >> water came in from everywhere. they were saying. and didn't know where it was coming from. had to go in there while they were on air, breathing air. we had to have hoses in there. we didn't know what the atmosphere was. >> two men were able to escape. but a body of a third worker was found about 50 feet inside the tunnel. >>> in nearby beaumont, texas, a tornado struck without warning in a crowded shopping center, sending people running for their lives. the twister touched down outside the kohl's department store, around 2:00 tuesday afternoon, catching shoppers offguard. a worker at a nearby restaurant grabbed his cell phone, capturing this video of the twister's powerful winds. >> it went over towards walmar
. uncompensated care in america cost $43 billion. you and i pay that tax. now, -- i want to address the 47 million who do not have health care coverage, to bring them into the system and that can help lower cost by having a bigger risk pools. the second thing i want to do is having meaningful cost of health care reform. let's start with medicare. i want to close the doughnut hole on prescription drugs. i want to make sure all of our seniors have access to the medications they need and that no one in america over 55 or 65 casta make this terrible decision, to lead by a meal or the prescription drugs that i need? yew instead both the there are some specialized prescription drugs that cost a lot of money. i want to make sure a catastrophic illness does not bankrupt families in america. in our district alone, the 11th congressional district, last year, 1430 families filed for bankruptcy because of health care costs. any family in america, young or old, could be one accident or one illness away from catastrophic health care costs. capping health-care -- catastrophic costs so that the family is forced i
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